Tips to prevent and treat Bug Bites

bug bites

Although most bug bites are harmless, some can spread dangerous diseases like Zika virus, dengue, Lyme disease, and malaria. Particularly if you’re visiting areas with known insect-borne diseases, it’s important to take steps to reduce your risk.

To help prevent bug bites, dermatologists recommend the following tips. Please visit this website for tips to prevent and treat bug bites!

Please contact us if you have any concerns or questions in caring for your skin. We are here for You.

Reference: https://www.aad.org/public/skin-hair-nails/injured-skin/bug-bites-and-stings#sthash.lHI8YQGs.dpuf

Keloids: How to prevent these raised scars

keloid

If you have (or had) a keloid, you have a higher risk of getting another one.  You also have a higher risk if one (or more) of your parents, siblings, or children has (had) a keloid.

The good news is that there are things you can do to reduce your risk of getting a full-blown keloid. Please find the common causes of keloids and what you can do to prevent each from causing a keloid.

Please contact us if you have any concerns or questions in caring for your skin. We are here for You.

Reference:  https://www.aad.org/public/diseases/bumps-and-growths/keloids#tips

Acne: Tips to Help You See Clearer Skin

acne

Acne is the most common skin condition in the United States. Although it’s common, accurate information about acne can be scarce. This can make it difficult to get clearer skin. The information on this site can help you understand acne and how to successfully treat it.

Please contact us if you have any concerns or questions in caring for your skin. We are here for You.

Reference: http://www.aad.org/public/diseases/acne-and-rosacea/acne

Psoriasis Skin Care Guide

psoriasis

Psoriasis (sore-EYE-ah-sis) is a chronic (long-lasting) disease. It develops when a person’s immune system sends faulty signals that tell skin cells to grow too quickly. New skin cells form in days rather than weeks.

The body does not shed these excess skin cells. The skin cells pile up on the surface of the skin, causing patches of psoriasis to appear. Psoriasis may look contagious, but it’s not.

Please contact us if you have any concerns or questions in caring for your skin. We are here for You.

Reference: https://www.aad.org/public/diseases/scaly-skin/psoriasis

How to safely exfoliate at home

exfoliation.jpg

Exfoliation is the process of removing dead skin cells from the outer layer of your skin. While some people believe that this improves the appearance of their skin, dermatologists from the American Academy of Dermatology say it’s not for everyone and – if not done properly – could do more harm than good. “For some people, exfoliation can actually make their skin worse – with increased redness or acne breakouts,” said board-certified dermatologist Rebecca Clare Tung, MD, FAAD, associate professor of dermatology, Loyola University Medical Center. “If you choose to exfoliate, it’s important to do so safely so that it does not damage your skin.

Please contact us if you have any concerns or questions in caring for your skin. We are here for You!

How to prevent and treat frostbite

frostbite

When the temperature dips below freezing, it’s critical to protect your skin from cold-weather health risks. Frostbite occurs when the skin – and sometimes the tissue beneath the skin – freezes due to prolonged exposure to cold temperatures. Depending on how long and how frozen the tissue, frostbite can result in severe, sometimes permanent, damage. To stay warm and prevent frostbite, follow these tips from dermatologists. This Winter has been tough on us in the New England Region! Frostbite can be a real threat with this weather. American Academy of Dermatology shares the helpful tips that can prevent the cold injuries.

Please contact us if you have any concerns or questions in caring for your skin. We are here for You!

How to treat cold sores

coldsores

Herpes simplex is a common viral infection. If you’ve ever had a cold sore or fever blister, you picked up the herpes simplex virus. Most cold sores are caused by herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1). There are things you can do at home to help manage cold sores. Watch this video to learn how to relive discomfort and avoid spreading the virus.

Please contact us if you have any concerns or questions in caring for your skin. We are here for You!

DermHelpCentral

DermHelpCentral is originally conceived and developed by David Elpern, M.D., a dermatologist in Williamstown, MA, as a means of providing a resource for patients who have skin disorders. The site has been maintained by Dr. Elpern, and has become a great place for the current updates of dermatological resources for many of us. You can find the area you are interested in under the Category Section which is in the right hand column of this page.

Please visit DermHelpCentral for the helpful resources for your dermatologic care.